A woman persists

Watch full screen

#awomanpersists #patryarchyseries #democracytocomeseries

Sources of implemented materials:
American Flag: https://giphy.com/gifs/animation-animated-usa-sFMDqop2ku4M0
Photograph: Photographed by Ethan James Green, Vogue, February 2020
Video: WATCH Elizabeth Warren speaks about decision to drop out of presidential race.mp4
Videostill: Reuters

Triptych

Triptych is a new project of cmunzartists, the cooperation between the artist Christine Munz and the philosopher Frans Geraedts.
In a weekly rhythm they will publish a series of works that contest the state of the world.

Multiple series will emerge within the project. A work can be a part of more then one series at the same time. In this way cross-overs, knots and nodes will appear.

Every work will combine three panels. All historical, religious and artistic references that this form evokes are welcomed and embraced: within a resolutely secular, conceptual and contemporary frame.

Every work will conjoin text and image. Sometimes other media will be added, music, for example or sound. The imagery will be varied: photographs, drawings, graphics, paintings, films, videos, gifs.

Every work is viewable, can be experienced online. They will all reside on a blog on the cmunzartist website. Access will be distributed through social media: facebook, twitter, instagram.

The image below is an entrance to the work. In this particular case it is a fragment of a video. To see the work click on the link. It will open directly on this blog page.

DE DUIDINGEN / 2013 – ongoing

ONDER DE GROND, twaalf duidingen

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→ project website

De angst geen toekomst te hebben
Niemand is hier van hier
De jarenlangzame verstikkingsdood van mijn vader draag ik voor altijd met mij mee
De stemming is somber
Met de grond gelijk maken, wissen, uit het geheugen en uit het landschap, kaal slaan
De ondergrond is er niet stabiel
Persoonlijkheden aangevreten door passieve agressie
De vrouwen van de oostelijke mijnstreek minachten de mannen van de oostelijke mijnstreek
Men ziteetkijktrooktdrinkt het eigen zelf vroeg dood
Het verleden uit de weg ruimen! De weg vrij maken voor de toekomst!
Heb ik iets aan die mijnwerkers te danken dan? Ben ik ze soms iets verschuldigd? Wie zegt dat? Nou?
Wie slim is, vertrekt

 

 

♦  ♦  ♦

CREDITS:

WOORDEN/WORDS Frans Geraedts

BEELDEN/PICTURES Christine Munz

copyright cmunz artists

MONUMENT FOR A FUTURE WAR / 2017 – 2018

CROWDFUNDING AN ARTIST

MONUMENT FOR A FUTURA WAR

A public art event on armistice day 2018, In Liege, Maastricht and Aachen.

100 years after the end of the war to end all wars, in three cities in the heart of Europe, across three borders, a manifestation will take place that commemorates. It will take its cue from the wild hope, the fervent wish, the desperate desire that swept across Europe when the first world war was, finally, millions of dead to late, brought to an exhausted end. Up to this historical moment war had been understood as an acceptable instrument of statecraft, a continuation of politics with other means, an important vehicle of progress, a way for nations to measure up, a stage for heroism and valor. That traditional view of war did not survive the slaughter.

For the first time in history the idea of banishing war took hold. It became a rallying cry for politicians and citizens alike. cmunz-artists will in cooperation with the three municipalities stage an event where that hope, that wish, that desire -to make an end to war, to make war end, to stop the killing at last, to make peace last- will manifest itself again, in all its mad glory.

The event will combine the mnemonics of a leporello, the rhetorics of a speech, the impact of a letter, the immersion within a 360° photograph, the wonder of a magic trick, the awe that large scale projections inspire, the stubborn inertia of monuments, the intelligence of a long conversation and the churn of a full blown requiem.

The art event “Monument of a future war” will let that hope manifest itself through the century of failure that followed. It will confront the wish to end war with the horrors that have been wrought in the hundred years since the wish was born. It will force the desire for peace to face up to the reality that the killing has never stopped, continues, lies already ahead. Only in this way the commemoration can do justice to the dead. Only in this way the commemoration may raise them up again, these crazy banners, these specters that lead astray, these false promises. Only in this way, by acknowledging the failure, the horrors, the killing-to-come, the commemoration has a chance to achieve the impossible: to think: how to prevent war.

research pictures commemor

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DOG TAGS, research

Army dog tags from the Netherlands, Germany and Belgium

war monument

inspired by ROBERT FILLIOU’s COMMEMOR

MUZIEK/MUSIC Hardy Mertens

WOORDEN/WORDS Frans Geraedts

BEELDEN/PICTURES Christine Munz

copyright cmunz artists

MACHINES OF MOURNING / 2010 – ongoing

Machines of Mourning

Machines of Mourning is a work of art. The work engages the history of coal mining. It retraces loss. It retraces the losses connected with the work in the mines and the losses connected with the closure of the mines. The work resists nostalgia. It does not flinch.

Machines of Mourning is a video symphony. It combines a wind music symphony played by a large brass band with a video art installation independently projected on four large screens. It is an immersive experience, both for the musicians and for the public. 

The work has five parts. On Foot / Sinoci; Down’ Pit / Koel; Father’s Lament / Het Vaderlament; Proud Men / Inne Staatse Maan; Out Of Breath / Sjtub. Always anticipating the inevitable end of coalmining the work starts with the haunted walk of a migrant, follows that up with a descent into a black screeching pit, creates a portrait of the miner as a dead father, still not grieved, shows the erasure of the mines as an act of collective humiliation, bears witness to an unbearable slow death by asphyxiation. 

The work as a whole overwhelms. It enforces a mourning. 

filmstills

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Machines of Mourning is the work of an artist, Christine Munz, a composer, Hardy Mertens, a philosopher, Frans Geraedts and of the citizenry of ‘de Oostelijke Mijnstreek’, the former coal mining district of the Netherlands. The creation of the work started in 2010. By now dozens of coal miners family’s, hundreds of amateur musicians, thousands of citizens, three actors, a poet, a handful local politicians, five different conductors, four different brass bands, a choir, over thirty volunteers, a Syrian refugee, an artistic director of a festival and six local artists have participated in the creation of MoM. They have influenced the work directly and indirectly by staging and performing and witnessing and commenting and criticizing a stream of public rehearsals and try outs and premieres of fragments and parts. The work has by design been build up slowly, piece by piece, part after part, to make this wide participation possible, to make it possible that experiences generated by a performance of a fragment or part can be taken into account when the next piece is composed or written or scripted or filmed.

Fifty years after the closure of the mines the former coal mining district of the Netherlands, de Oostelijke mijnstreek, is still in decline. MoM intervenes in that process. Its creation, staging, performance and witnessing has enabled and will enable correcting emotional experiences. What was not acknowledged will be. What was ungrievable will become grievable. What has not yet been mourned, now, finally, will be. MoM is an act of collective self therapy.

The cultural institutions of the district have yet to find the courage to stage MoM in its complete version. It has now been programmed three times on a prominent local platform -with conviction, enthusiasm and a lot of support- only to see its performance cancelled on short notice.

Machines of Mourning is “eine Zumutung”, it is a bitter medicine, it reveals pain fully

♦  ♦  ♦ 

Machines of Mourning has a local signature. It is created for and by a specific community, the citizenry of the ‘oostelijke mijnstreek’.

Its significance however is not limited to that community, to this specific time and place. Machines of Mourning will be send on tour to the other former coal mining districts in Western Europe; in France, Belgium and Germany; in England and Wales. That will be like a visit with relatives that share a rich and traumatic and very particular history. MoM will be welcomed there, understood, embraced.

Beyond that inner circle MoM will have an even greater impact. For those communities worldwide where the coal is still mined a performance of MoM could be a seminal event. Almost all of them are in a deep crisis. The coming demise of coal leads into a death spiral of lower investment, worse safety, higher risk, longer working hours and lower wages. That will weaken the miners communities to such an extent that when the closure finally arrives -and it always will- the will and the capacity to chart a different future will have been eroded beyond repair. The anticipatory mourning of MoM offers a chance to escape that hopeless fate. It mobilizes the inner strength of the communities, it releases the energies bound up in denial and rage, it makes it possible for the miners and their families to take matters in their own hands, to decide together when and how to walk away.

Machines of Mourning has a local signature. It reads: ‘the citizens of the ‘oostelijke mijnstreek”. MoM is their gift to the coal mining communities of the world. It is a peculiar gift, because it condemns those who receive it. It enforces a mourning -of a death, an end, a demise that has not yet arrived -but surely will. MoM is a gift that condemns -but then sets those it condemned free -free to choose a future -free to choose a future of their own design.

Machines of Mourning is a gift.

SJTUB logo

studioopname vaderlament, gespeeld door wim steinmann (flute), bert steinmann (english horn), peter steinmann (french horn), johan steinmann (bassoon), met video (1/5)

about sjtub, fragment uit toespraak frans geraedts, in het gemeentehuis kerkrade. ca 6′ uit 40′ 2011/09/30

kaalslag fragment, centerprojectie, een uit zes, original video 2 x 8′ loop

sjtub gespeelt door het koninklijk harmonieorkest kerkrade, at highlite international, fragment, 2′, 2014/05/30+31

credits

MUZIEK/MUSIC Hardy Mertens

WOORDEN/WORDS Frans Geraedts

BEELDEN/PICTURES Christine Munz

copyright cmunz artists